Good Old Facebook

Posted filed under crisis management, Marketing, Media Relations, social networking, Web, Web 2.0.

Facebook makes some changes to its design, and most of the Internet goes batty.

I don’t blame them, really. Why is Facebook messing with a good thing? If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it, right?

Most of the reaction I saw online was negative. “I don’t like it.” “Great, Facebook is Twitter now.” “I want my old Facebook back.” (In fact, you CAN have your old Facebook back.)

It seems like Facebook was in a frenzied rush to keep up with their second-largest competitor, even though they currently dwarf that competitor and are still enjoying dramatic growth. I don’t get why they are struggling to be something that they aren’t, and scrambling to be something that someone else already is. To me, it smacks of desperation at a time when calm is called for.

This now marks two questionable PR moves from Facebook in the last several weeks. And you know what they say in the news business…. “Three’s a trend.”

This wonderful post was written by

Andrea Bogos Trapani is partner at Identity, responsible for the growth and management of the firm’s media relations and marketing practice area. Andrea specializes in public relations, media relations and marketing strategies.

3 comments
Tom Nixon
Tom Nixon

I actually like this analogy from the Tanner-Friedman blog: "When I worked in TV news, we didn’t talk much about customer service. At every station, we were obsessed with “beating our competition” in ways that our customers never even noticed. We had to be “live” in front of darkened buildings. We had to tout “exclusive” camera angles. We had to tell our customers over and over again that we brought them a story “first” (if only by a few seconds) even though we knew they didn’t care. Why did we do all of this? Because our bosses and consultants told us to. And now, the industry is living with the impact of those directives. Today, I fear Facebook is now making similar mistakes." Too much of this new reinvention smacks of keeping up with the competitive Joneses. You can't run your business solely based on what your competitors are doing. Leaders lead. Followers follow. If you think Facebook is immune to the dangers of over-reinvention, ask yourself about the last time your drank a "New Coke."

Brandon Chesnutt
Brandon Chesnutt

If you look at the history of the company, nearly EVERY single move and change they have made (opening up to non-college students, open source applications, Facebook pages, Facebook connect) has benefited its user base in some way and improved its features and service offerings. You just need to have a little faith…

Brandon Chesnutt
Brandon Chesnutt

If you look at the history of the company, nearly EVERY single move and change they have made (opening up to non-college students, open source applications, Facebook pages, Facebook connect) has benefited its user base in some way and improved its features and service offerings. You just need to have a little faith…

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